WELCOME TO ZAMBIA

The land of the legendary African walking safari, Victoria Falls, the wild Zambezi River, abundant wildlife, and raw wilderness, all in one friendly country. Come and experience our hospitality wherever you go and get in touch with our wide variety of fascinating cultures and local traditions. Our people are ready to show you our country’s natural wonders, draw you into the rhythm and soul of Africa, give you close encounters with our regal wildlife and take you on an unforgettable journey through our ancient and recent past.

We guarantee you will have incredible stories to tell …

Zambia Fast Facts

Geography

Zambia, a landlocked country in south-central Africa, is about one-tenth larger than Texas. It is surrounded by Angola, Zaire, Tanzania, Malawi, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Botswana, and Namibia. The country is mostly a plateau that rises to 8,000 ft (2,434 m) in the east.

Capital

Lusaka

Political system

President Kaunda imposed single-party socialism, in which his United National Independence Party (UNIP) was the only legal political party within a ”one-party participatory democracy”.
Constitutional change was introduced in 1991 under popular pressure, allowing a multi-party system and a change of leadership.
Zambia has a reputation for political stability and a relatively efficient, transparent government..

Economy

Kenneth Kaunda – who led the country at independence and for the next three decades – introduced central planning into the economy and nationalized key sectors including the copper mines. His policies, together with a drop in copper prices, are blamed for the country’s economic woes during his time. The country’s economic fortunes began to change in the late 1990s when the privatization of the mining sector began to draw in foreign investment and improve output. Government support for agriculture is also said to have contributed to economic growth, averaging around 6% a year in recent years.

Tourism

Zambia is commonly regarded as one of the most beautiful, friendly, diverse and unspoilt countries on the entire African continent. Aside from the majestic Victoria Falls, Zambia has more natural water resources than any other southern African country, including a myriad of other falls dotted across the country, not to mention the famous Zambezi River. The many National Parks offer great opportunities for observing Africa’s plains game and their attendant predators, whilst bustling urban areas offer a taste of eclectic Zambian culture.

Population

Zambia’s population comprises more than 70 Bantu-speaking ethnic groups. Some ethnic groups are small, and only two have enough people to constitute at least 10% of the population. The majority of Zambians are subsistence farmers, but the country is also fairly urbanised, with 42% of the population being city residents. Expatriates, mostly British or South African, as well as some white Zambian citizens (about 40,000), live mainly in Lusaka and in the Copperbelt in northern Zambia, where they are either employed in mines, financial and related activities or retired. Zambia also has a small but economically important Asian population, most of whom are Indians.

Currency

The Zambian kwacha, denoted by ZMK, is the official currency that has been used in Zambia since 1968. The ZMK, which is further divided into 100 ngwee, gets its name from the Bemba word for “dawn” which alludes to the Zambian nationalist slogan of a “new dawn of freedom”. In 2003, Zambia printed its 500 and 1000 banknotes on polymer, being the first African country to do so.

Climate

The general height of the land gives Zambia a more pleasant climate than that experienced in most tropical countries. There are three seasons – cool and dry from May to August, hot and dry from September to November, and warm and wet from December to April. Only in the Valleys of the Zambezi and Luangwa is there excessive heat, particularly in October and, in the wet season, a high humidity. In the warm wet season, frequent heavy showers and thunderstorms occur, followed by spells of bright sunshine. Plants grow profusely and rivers and streams fill up almost overnight. During the cool dry season, night frosts may occur in places sheltered from the wind. The countryside dries up gradually and grass fires, fanned by high winds are a feature of this time of the year. In depressions, frost can occur on cloudless nights. Temperatures rise high during the hot, dry season but new leaves appear on the trees before the start of the rains and new grass brightens the countryside. The main growing period of woody vegetation is between August and November.

Communications

Zambia has a developing communications infrastructure. A number of cell-phone providers provide national coverage and there are well-established landline phone networks. Internet and Wi-Fi are easily accessible in most urban areas.

Provinces

Zambia is divided into 10 provinces and 72 districts. Central; Copperbelt; Eastern; Luapula; Lusaka; Muchinga; Northern; North Western; Southern; Western.

National Symbols

The flag was adopted October 24, 1964. Green represents agriculture, orange the country’s copper, red symbolizes the struggle for freedom, and black represents the people. The eagle is from the country’s official coat of arms. National Bird: African Fish Eagle

Ticks

Generally out in the early spring can be found in long grasses and trees. They may carry tick-bite fever, however it is easily treated. To help protect yourself, wear long trousers tucked into white socks, making the ticks more visible, and a hat to protect against ticks falling from trees. Always check your clothing and body for ticks, especially the legs, behind the knees, groin area, as well as the scalp and behind the ears.

Bilharzia

Avoid drinking or swimming in stagnant water that is not flowing or inhabited by fresh water snails. Natal, with its humid forests and oversized snails is one such area where care should be taken.